DSLRS Gone in 25 Years?

This man thinks so:

Say goodbye? Full-frame DSLRs gone by 2025 claims Dr. Rajiv Laroia, imaging startup Light

Light's technology involves using multiple small camera modules to achieve image quality normally associated with cameras having much larger sensors. This computer rendering shows one concept for their technology, apparently using 11 camera modules; four tiny ones typical of current smart phones, and seven larger ones. The number of camera modules can be scaled up and down as needed; the current prototype being developed uses a total of 16 camera modules.
Light’s technology involves using multiple small camera modules to achieve image quality normally associated with cameras having much larger sensors. This computer rendering shows one concept for their technology, apparently using 11 camera modules; four tiny ones typical of current smart phones, and seven larger ones. The number of camera modules can be scaled up and down as needed; the current prototype being developed uses a total of 16 camera modules.

Will full-frame DSLRs be a thing of the past, 10 years hence? “Never” is a perilous word when it comes to technology, but full-frame SLRs gone, really? Ten years certainly seems like a bit of a reach, but that’s exactly what Dr. Rajiv Laroia, the Chief Technical Officer of imaging startup company Light predicted, when I spoke with him recently. (I’m sure our readers will weigh in with their own thoughts in the comments below 😉

We told you about Light and their unique multi-lens/sensor camera technology a bit over a week ago, now we’re back with all sorts of juicy technical details about how their technology works, fresh from an interview with Rajiv and his co-founder and CEO Dave Grannan. It was an interesting conversation, to say the least.

The photo industry has certainly seen its share of bold technical claims that fail to pan out, but Messrs. Laroia and Grannan have extremely impressive resumes, and well-proven track records of bringing cutting-edge technology to market in successful products. Dave Grannan has been around the Mobile space for years, with previous stints at Nokia, Sprint, and Geoworks, and as CEO of Vlingo, whose speech recognition technology was behind the first Siri app and Samsung’s S Voice offering. Then there’s Rajiv Laroia. If you use a cell phone, you probably use technology Rajiv pioneered every day: His former company Flarion Technologies was the developer of 4G/LTE cell phone technology. (Yes, that LTE). Qualcomm bought Flarion in 2006 for $600MM to acquire both their patents and their tech team, Rajiv foremost among them. These days, he can clearly afford any camera/lens he wants, but decided to revolutionize the photography business instead. READ ALL

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